VIRO – Proposal for TV Series – Introduction

Introduction

And so the task begins, as I start to turn the highly successful VIRO book series into a proposal for a TV series. Over the coming weeks, I will be sharing insights and updates as to how this process is going.  So let’s begin at the beginning.

VIRO – The TV Series Proposal

GENRE: Horror/Science Fiction – Post-Apocalypse

TAG LINE: Four Kids, One Apocalypse

LOG LINE: As a viral pandemic turns the world into bloodthirsty creatures, a boy with special needs looks for his missing mum.

VIRO tells the story of Jake, a boy born with special needs who wakes one morning to find that the world has been catastrophically overrun by a deadly virus and his mum has not come home after work. Determined but unused to being out on his own, Jake sets off to find her.

The book series is set in the south east of England and Season One takes place in Burton-on-Sea, a fictional seaside town modelled on Hastings. The time is somewhere in the 1970s. 

There is no knowing exactly where the virus came from and the point of the series is that no-one will ever know. There is a lot of speculation but no definitive explanation. This makes VIRO darker and bleaker as we soon come to realise that the world will not be saved. 

The story is not a race to find a cure but about finding a way to simply survive. Science, like God, and society, is broken now. It makes no difference, especially to a group of teenage friends who don’t really have time to try and make sense of what has happened.  They just want to stay alive.

VIRO – the Book Series – NEWS FLASH

As a viral outbreak turns the world into bloodthirsty creatures, a boy with special needs looks for his missing mum.

‘The writing style is beautifully compelling, and after the first couple of pages I couldn’t put it down. The author very skilfully creates a world and characters through deceptively simple prose that draws the reader right in. It is a fascinating blend of one-after-the-other edge-of-the seat scares, alongside a haunting narrative about what it is to be human.’

‘Capturing the voice of a young character with special needs (I spent 25 years as a special education teacher/administrator), Taylor’s story of a group of young people coping with a world disintegrating in front of them; with the loss of structure and trust, and with betrayal by the adults who should be protecting them is both uplifting and horrifying. Do not be fooled by the simple language of the narrator: there are hard questions asked and realistic, unsentimental consequences to the apocalypse confronting the children, and an ending that you are unlikely to forget easily.’

‘I absolutely loved this book. Powerful and poignant, VIRO packs a punch. Sad and haunting, VIRO is a new take on the zombie genre. The characters are dynamic and interesting, finding strength despite their horrifying circumstances. Jake is a character that will stick with you long after the final page. The action sequences are thrilling. I was on the edge of my seat!’

Get your copy today – Book One FREE for download HERE

Inteachán – Book Five: The Tallest Tower Crane 5: 13 ‘the ultimate reality television show’

The city continued to be pulled apart and as it was so the significance of records and metrics came once more to the fore.

It wouldn’t be a genocide without the concomitant cataloguing and noting and so the task fell to an army of hastily-appointed trustees with a civil service background to collect the last will and testament of every citizen.

Like the ultimate reality television show, everybody began to be forced at gunpoint to leave a record on video of who they once were.

Once their message was recorded, they were herded back to whichever landmark they had been assigned to destroy and the process continued.

Inteachán – Book Two: A New Signal 2: 7 ‘People missing people’

And then the posters started.

Like petals fallen from the most hopeless of blooms. Handwritten. Photocopied. Badly printed.

Missing people. People missing people.

Everyone who attended the concert never returned home. Including Inteachán.

Though he knew it was helpless, Mac pinned his poster with the rest of them.

Inteachán – Book Two: A New Signal 2: 6 ‘The Weeds of Priory Hall’

Cities normally return to nature after desertion.

Sand can cover office blocks.

Shopping centres fall in on themselves.

Civic buildings lose all semblance of significance.

Sewers clog and silt.

Vehicles return their elements to the earth.

Or house new tenants.

Fountains fall silent.

Slowly, troublingly, desperately, inexorably, the weeds of Priory Hall exerted their cosmic influence on the city.

Inteachán – Book Two: A New Signal 2: 5 ‘It started with the weeds’

As he walked across Front Square Mac felt now that the world was only different.

He knew the First of the TheFive was here. The disturbance was now unignorable. The weight of this fact caused the world to spin ever so slightly out of kilter.

‘I knew this was always going to happen,’ Mac said to himself. And he steeled himself for the worst.

It started with the weeds.

Inteachán – Book One: The Song of the NotBeSpeak 1: 10 ‘Fomhóire’

Mac stopped reading. He turned to Inteachán.

‘Every civilisation has its own names for spirits and faeries and demons and balrogs and wights. Here we have always tended to use the word ‘Fomhóire.’’

Mac smiled.

‘We have always known them this way but I now know them as another – the NotBeSpeak.’

‘But what are they?’ asked Inteachán. ‘I don’t understand.’

Mac smiled again.

‘How could you?’ he said kindly. ‘They are Everything and Nothing at once. All and Nought together.’

Inteachán – Book One: The Song of the NotBeSpeak 1: 9 ‘Cataclysm’

‘Every infection needs a host,’ said Mac, ‘and the NotBeSpeak need the biggest host of all; the world.’

‘How do we stop them?’ asked Inteachán.

‘How do you stop them,’ Mac corrected her. ‘I am old and my days of fighting inter-dimensional demons intent upon cataclysm are long gone.’

‘How do I stop them?’

‘They can only be stopped by preventing them from taking their final form.’

Mac smiled sadly.

‘If we know what final form they wish to take then that is how we can stop them.’

He paused.

‘But, I am only now beginning to understand what form their final form will take.’

Inteachán – Book One: The Song of the NotBeSpeak 1: 8 ‘The What-be-Speak?’

It was growing dark outside. Inteachán pulled the curtains over the window. In the orange glow of the lamp Mac looked even more ancient than normal. Inteachán sat down on the small footstool in front of the fire.

‘What are the What-Be-Speak?’ she asked.

‘Not ‘What,” Mac replied, ‘but Why.’

He looked into the distance.

‘I have spent my whole adult life searching for an answer to that question. I am no closer to the answer now than I was when I started.’

He blew his nose vigorously.

‘In fact, I’m probably further away today than I have ever been.’

Inteachán – Book One: The Song of the NotBeSpeak 1: 7 ‘A Sighing Sound’

Everyone said that it was a gas leak that caused the explosion that destroyed No. 23 Wolseley Close but Inteachán and Professor Mac an Bhaird know better.

‘Do you remember hearing anything just before the explosion?’ asked Mac. ‘Think carefully.’

‘I think I remember a sighing sound,’ replied Inteachán. ‘Like a sigh that got louder and started to scream.’

‘‘Fomhóire,’ Mac said softly. ‘The NotBeSpeak.’

‘The What-be-Speak?’ said Inteachán.

‘They walk among us,’ replied Mac. ‘Since the start of Time and even before.’